Daily Haiku: Alan Summers’ Week–May 28 through June 3, 2018

Dear Loyal Readers and Followers:

Today, Monday, May 28 through Sunday, June 3, you will enjoy a week’s worth of Alan Summers’ haiku. Alan lives in the UK, and his work often appears on this blog.

His websites listed below are very interesting and useful, and they are well worth checking out:

http://www.callofthepage.org

http://area17.blogspot.com

 

Enjoy these seven selections (one for each day and re-read them). Learn from them, as this is what The Daily Haiku is all about–learning and improving your skills.

 

leafdrop a shrew journeys its path

Yanty’s Butterfly: Haiku Nook Anthology
, 2016

 

 

breaking windows
the childhood gang
of mostly one

Haiku Windows, The Haiku Foundation, February 2018

 

 

dead sparrow
how light the evening
comes to a close

Haiku Canada Review, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2017

 

 

empirical owls . . .
the sheep gather quietly
into their own bones


“Gwdihŵ” Wales Haiku Journal
, Issue One, Spring 2018

 
river-moss the mallards feeding the day slowly

 

Wales Haiku Journal, Issue One, March 2018

 

 

 

a drone’s hum
the Hunter’s moon
clears cloud

otata, #11, November 2016

 

 

 

night train
a window screams
out of an owl

 

“Gwdihŵ” Wales Haiku Journal, Issue One, Spring 2018

 

 

 

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About Charlotte Digregorio

I publish books. I have marketed and/or published 55 titles. These books are sold in 46 countries to bookstores, libraries, universities, professional organizations, government agencies, and book clubs. I recently received an Official Commendation from Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner for my thirty-eight years of accomplishments in the literary arts, and my work to promote and advance the field by educating adults and students alike. I am the author of five non-fiction books: Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All; Everything You Need to Know About Nursing Homes; You Can Be A Columnist; Beginners' Guide to Writing & Selling Quality Features; and Your Original Personal Ad. The first four books have been adopted as supplemental texts at universities throughout the U.S., Canada, India, Pakistan, and Catalonia. They are sold in 43 countries, and are displayed in major metropolitan cultural centers. These books have been reviewed, recommended, and praised by hundreds of critics, librarians, and professors worldwide. I am also the author of a poetry collection: "Shadows of Seasons: Selected Haiku and Senryu." Two of my books have been Featured Selections of Writer's Digest Book Club. I am regularly interviewed by major print, radio, and television organizations throughout the U.S. I regularly sign books at libraries, chain bookstores, and university bookstores, and do poetry readings at art centers, cafes, tea houses, and galleries. I was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize in poetry. I have won forty-seven poetry awards, writing twelve poetic forms. My poetry has been translated into eight languages. I do illustrated solo poetry exhibits 365 days a year in libraries, galleries, corporate buildings, hospitals, convention centers, and other venues. My individual poems have been displayed at supermarkets, apparel and wine shops, banks, botanic gardens, restaurants, and on public transit. I have been nominated and listed in "The International Authors and Writers Who's Who" in Cambridge, England and in the "Who's Who In Writers, Editors & Poets U.S./Canada." I hosted my own radio program, "Poetry Beat," on public broadcasting. My poetry has been featured on several library web sites including those of Shreve Memorial Library in Louisiana and Cornell University's Mann Library. My background includes positions as a feature editor and columnist at daily newspapers and as a magazine editor. I have been a public relations director for a non-profit organization. I am self-employed as a public relations/marketing consultant, having served a total of 118 clients in 23 states for the past several decades . In other professional areas, I have been on university faculties, teaching French, Italian, and Writing. I regularly give lectures and workshops on publishing, journalism, publicity, poetry, and creativity to business and professional groups, and at writer's conferences, universities, literary festivals, non-profit organizations, and libraries. I have been a writer-in-residence at universities. There have been about 400 articles written about me in the media. I have served on the Boards of writers and publishers organizations. My positions have included Board Secretary of the Northwest Association of Book Publishers. I served for five years as Midwest Regional Coordinator of The Haiku Society of America, and for two years as its Second Vice President.
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44 Responses to Daily Haiku: Alan Summers’ Week–May 28 through June 3, 2018

  1. Dear Charlotte,

    Looking forward to a great week of haiku! Read and Learn!

    😉

  2. madhuri says:

    What a treat! Looking forward.

  3. haikutec says:

    Reblogged this on Haikutec’s Weblog and commented:
    Honoured to be featured for a whole week at Charlotte Digregrio’s highly respected Daily Haiku blog site.

    As a grouping of poems they have an underlying theme of journey in all its different aspects.

    leafdrop a shrew journeys its path

    breaking windows
    the childhood gang
    of mostly one
     
    dead sparrow
    how light the evening
    comes to a close

    empirical owls . . .
    the sheep gather quietly
    into their own bones

    river-moss the mallards feeding the day slowly
     
    a drone’s hum
    the Hunter’s moon
    clears cloud
     
    night train
    a window screams
    out of an owl

    Alan Summers

  4. haikutec says:

    leafdrop a shrew journeys its path

    Alan Summers

    Award Credit: Runner-up, The Haiku Calendar Competition 2016
    Publication Credit: The Haiku Calendar 2017 (Snapshot Press, 2016)
    Anthology Credit: Yanty’s Butterfly: Haiku Nook Anthology
 ed. Jacob Salzer and Nook Editorial Staff (March 2016)

    Do check out this anthology, which gives donations to charity too!
    Yanty’s Butterfly: Haiku Nook Anthology
, 2016
    https://jsalzer.wixsite.com/yantysbutterfly

  5. A great selection – looking forward to reading the rest.

    marion

  6. Unique verses from a talented poet. I see your verses have been published in a variety of journals and such, Alan. You’ve inspired me to try submitting some of my verses. 🙂

    • haikutec says:

      Hi Christine,
      I am delighted that you will take the plunge!

      After years of submitting work, I finally see rejections as an opportunity either to fine-tune a poem, or re-submit as it is.

      My dead sparrow haiku was rejected several times, despite Nicholas Klacsanzky wanting to publish a commentary on it months before it got accepted first!

      It was an extra delight to have it accepted, along with another couple of rejected poems, by the legendary LeRoy Gorman, and in this last stint as editor of Haiku Canada Review.

      Editors can be wonderfully helpful if they support you, and I’ve been fortunate to have a few help, and been in a position as an editor, to help others.

      Here’s the commentary that Nick waited patiently for several months to post:
      https://haikucommentary.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/alan-summers-sparrow/

      warm regards,
      Alan

    • haikutec says:

      It’s taken me a few years, but now I see a rejection as an opportunity. It’s a second chance. Also it’s a good way of reducing disappointment if it goes out again, and quickly, thus maintaining the excitement and anticipation of success, or another chance to re-submit.

      But always double-check for any errors before doing that. 🙂

    • Write haiku and publish, Christine!

  7. JanBenTexas says:

    Alan,
    This one deeply resonates with me.
    .

    empirical owls . . .
    the sheep gather quietly
    into their own bones

    “Gwdihŵ” Wales Haiku Journal, Issue One, Spring 2018
    .
    Also, I’m happy to see yet another British Journal enter the market.

    Jan Benson
    Texas

  8. Paul Beech says:

    Returning to my screen after a few days away, great to find this selection of Alan’s work. Yes, from his journeying shrew to his empirical owls, work to savour, study and squirrel-away to enjoy again for their freshness, originality and oneness with nature. A favourite of mine is the one about the poor dead sparrow.

    (By the way, Alan, I know Hemingway’s six-worder about the baby shoes too. How closely senryu and micro-stories rub shoulders!)

    My very best,

    Paul

    • haikutec says:

      Thanks Paul,

      Yes, I don’t know if I consciously realised there was a kind of journey theme going on. I even found those sheep in a boyhood photo, on my regular Welsh farm visiting my aunt and her family.

      There seemed to be proof that Hemingway lifted the story straight off a small ad in a magazine, but whichever is the case, it’s a pack-filled six word story with poignancy.

      I’m so glad you have enjoyed the selection and the one about the sparrow. That was our first fatality after moving into a new home, which housed sparrows. Third year running and we haven’t seen any other casualties. Karen did spot one youngster who hit the ground, but the parents were around, and he eventually airlifted himself.

      Alan

  9. haikutec says:

    re:

    breaking windows
    the childhood gang
    of mostly one

    Alan Summers
    Haiku Windows, The Haiku Foundation, February 2018

    I do remember going through a phase of this kind of thing when I was 7 or 8 years old. And that I struggled to be interested in being affiliated to any one gang except my own.

    This comes from the great Haiku Foundation themed feature of all sorts of windows each week. There’ll be another set of themed haiku tomorrow, and announcing the following week’s window theme. Do join in!

    Haiku Windows
    https://www.thehaikufoundation.org/tag/haiku-windows/

  10. Reblogged this on Frank J. Tassone and commented:
    #Haiku Happenings #2: Charlotte Digregorio’s Daily Haiku features Alan Summers all this week!

  11. haikutec says:

    dead sparrow
    how light the evening
    comes to a close

    Alan Summers
    Haiku Canada Review, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2017

    This was LeRoy Gorman’s last issue as its editor, so i am very proud he choose a few of my haiku including this one.

    For an interesting commentary see:
    https://haikucommentary.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/alan-summers-sparrow/

    Oddly, this haiku struggled to find a home, and Nick’s support, as he wanted to post the commentary very early on, spurred me to submit this haiku to one more place.

    Thank you Nick, thank you LeRoy!

  12. haikutec says:

    empirical owls . . .
    the sheep gather quietly
    into their own bones

    Alan Summers
    Gwdihŵ (haiku sequence)
    Wales Haiku Journal issue one Spring 2018

    Note: Gwdihŵ means: Owl
    How you say it: Good-ee-hoo

    I have always been fascinated in the two empires, that of day, and that of night. As a boy, spending Summer on my aunt’s farm in St Bridges Major near Bridgend, Glamorgan, Wales, mucking out, or getting ready to enter night sleep, we can’t help but briefly touch those empires that don’t belong to us.

    Owls are a very strong symbol of the night’s empire, they are the Truth, and lo and behold anything caught unawares. At my time, in later years, in Bradford on Avon (England) when Karen would be away, I’d be up deep into the early hours. It’s the sounds between the owl hoots we have to be wary of. Not everything escapes the empire of owls that control this time.

    Another strong sight and smell of being near farms and vast rough fields in Wales, is the sheep. If you scroll down this article, you’ll find a few sheep of my childhood, gathering bones now in a different way:
    http://area17.blogspot.com/2018/04/haiku-art-of-implication-over.html

    warm regards,
    Alan

  13. haikutec says:

    Living in the South West of England it’s always about the river, the River Avon, in fact.

    I’ve been fortunate enough to live in two small towns that are dominated by the river: Bradford on Avon, and now Chippenham.

    I am only minutes away from one part of the river or another, and ducks in particular.

    So this poem is partly written by those ducks:

    river-moss the mallards feeding the day slowly

    Alan Summers
    Wales Haiku Journal, Issue One, March 2018

    It’s as if the ducks are feeding the day, keeping the daylight going, and slowing down time. I’ve written a lot about ducks from Bristol to Brisbane to Bradford on Avon and Chippenham.

    This was my first Chippenham haiku on ducks, a challenge set by Zee Zahava to only write about something seen on a particular day:

    those who stop —
    ducks taking colour
    from the river

    Alan Summers
    brass bell: a haiku journal curated by Zee Zahava (January 2017)

    For those who can, I hope you will be able to stop for ducks, and let them slow the day down for you: http://area17.blogspot.com/2017/06/stopping-for-ducks-and-week-of-haiku-by.html

    warm regards,
    Alan

  14. haikutec says:

    a drone’s hum
    the Hunter’s moon
    clears cloud

    Alan Summers
    otata, #11, November 2016

    This partly came about due to the advance of drones as military devices, and that Barack Obama said still haunts him, that he authorised their use.

    More and more drones are also used in peacetime, to add intriguing angles to still photography, and also add shots for a documentary not necessarily possible by other means.

    The Hunter’s moon is both a seasonal reference, but also how the moon, when full, or even when it’s not, is made use of for war. But it’s also a neutral comment on the power of the moon, its moonlight, and pull of the oceans.

    warm regards,
    Alan

  15. Congratulations Alan, I love your poems, expecially this one:

    breaking windows
    the childhood gang
    of mostly one
    *
    Best regards,
    Eufemia

  16. haikutec says:

    night train
    a window screams
    out of an owl

    Alan Summers

    Originally published as a standalone haiku at:
    Bones – journal for contemporary haiku no. 14 (November 15th 2017)

    Published again as part of a sequence:

    Gwdihŵ

    late deadline…
    keeping owl hours
    with the mice

    an owl’s empire
    the flecks of light
    in snow

    unnamed night
    the aviator’s goggles
    shaking feathers

    night train

    a window screams
    out of an owl

    five owls
    the time it takes
    to snow, slow

    empirical owls…
    the sheep gather quietly
    into their own bones

    Note: Gwdihŵ means: Owl
    How you say it: Good-ee-hoo
    https://www.walesonline.co.uk/lifestyle/fun-stuff/34-welsh-words-phrases-just-9545321

    haiku details:
    five owls (after Wales’ five owls): unpublished
    empirical owls: unpublished

    Published:
    late deadline: haijinx volume IV, issue 1 (2011)
    an owl’s empire: Presence issue #59 (November 2017)
    unnamed night (after “Untitled (Dark Owl)”2013 by Peter Doig): Ekphrasis: The British Haiku Society Members’ Anthology 2017 ed. Iliyana Stoyanova ISBN-13: 978-1906333089
    night train: Bones – journal for contemporary haiku no. 14 November 15th 20
    Wales Haiku Journal – Gwdihŵ haiku sequence Spring 2018

    So how did I come to write this slightly unusual haiku?

    night train

    a window screams
    out of an owl

    Night trains have their own rhythm where we are sleeping over on a train, and owls are a potent symbol of the night. I’m also inspired by art that depicted a surreal piece about a woman who is an owl. It’s purely imagistic, and para-ekphrastic as well.

    When poets are in their writing zone, unusual images and symbolism occurs. We can’t always explain as it’s unconscious writing, a little like automatic writing.

    warm regards,
    Alan

    • Paul Beech says:

      Hi Alan,

      Just want to say how much I enjoyed your recent week on Charlotte’s Daily Haiku. Brilliant work, and fascinating to read the back-story to each poem with autobiographical snippets along the way. Great to think of you as a lad, mucking out on your aunt’s farm in Wales!

      My very best,

      Paul

  17. alee9 says:

    Coming back to your blog after quite a long break, Charlotte, what a delightful treat to find Alan’s week of terrific haiku!!

    I’ve long admired his work and his caring for those struggling to understand haiku, but more so, those like me, who just couldn’t seem to write one. He has been very encouraging through my difficult years. Thanks again, Alan!

    And more thanks for this wonderful ‘journey’… I love all but especially the owls and the sheep. Most of all, thank you for the new learning in the background you wrote for some, and your insights like the last paragraph on the ‘owl’, which speaks to me strongly. May I keep it?

    “When poets are in their writing zone, unusual images and symbolism occurs. We can’t always explain as it’s unconscious writing, a little like automatic writing.”

    Warm regards,
    Alegria

  18. haikutec says:

    Thanks Alegria! 🙂

    You are very kind.

    I’m so glad my thoughts behind each haiku have been appreciated, and of interest.

    This one is certainly unusual, perhaps, but it’s inspired by both art (paintings); and also deeply influenced by both NIGHT MAIL by W.H. Auden and this documentary:

    “Night Mail is a 1936 English documentary film directed and produced by Harry Watt and Basil Wright, and produced by the General Post Office (GPO) film unit. The 24-minute film documents the nightly postal train operated by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) from London to Glasgow and the staff who operate it. Narrated by John Grierson and Stuart Legg, the film ends with a “verse commentary” written by W. H. Auden to score by composer Benjamin Britten. The locomotive featured in the film is Royal Scot Class No. 6115 Scots Guardsman.”

    “Night Mail premiered on 4 February 1936 at the Cambridge Arts Theatre in Cambridge, England in a launch programme for the venue. Its general release gained critical praise and became a classic of its own kind, much imitated by adverts and modern film shorts. Night Mail is widely considered a masterpiece of the British Documentary Film Movement.”
    Night Mail Wikipedia

    And I just discovered this wonderful band of musicians called Public Service Broadcasting and their various music films including this one:

    PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING – NIGHT MAIL

    The following music video with archive footage is also awesome, it’s called:
    Public Service Broadcasting/Inform – Educate – Entertain

    Both show the excitement and industry of the people who work through the “owl hours” to make sure society gets their mail, coffees in the morning for the early shift workers, construction workers, and later, on the office and various retail workers.

    night train

    a window screams
    out of an owl

    Alan Summers

    I actually had to deconstruct where I got my inspiration from, but it my poetic interpretation, as I was one of those “owl workers” from time to time. One of those “invisible workers” helping to make the world tick along as it starts to stir.

    “When poets are in their writing zone, unusual images and symbolism occurs. We can’t always explain as it’s unconscious writing, a little like automatic writing.”

    Thank you so much Alegria, for letting me have the opportunity to further work out how or why I wrote the poem, a shorthand homage. And if my quote helps in any way, I am deeply moved, please do keep it.

    warmest regards,

    Alan

  19. haikutec says:

    Inspired by everyone’s comments I created a post that features the night train, and how I might have got to write it that way, plus those sheep in the other owl haiku:

    When haiku get complicated – an attempt to explain
    along with W H Auden’s Night Train:
    http://area17.blogspot.com/2018/06/when-haiku-get-complicated-attempt-to.html

    warm regards,
    Alan

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