Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 28, 2022

New Year–

list of resolutions

in pencil

by Antonietta Losito (Italy)

Prune Juice, #30, March 2020 

new year’s resolutions . . .

what if I am the best

version of myself

by Vandana Parashar (India)

Haiku Dialogue, Jan. 1, 2020

The Haiku Foundation

 

 

Posted in Antonietta Losito, Daily Haiku, Haiku, India, Italy, Literature, Senryu, Vandana Parashar | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 27, 2022

wrapping gifts

tape sticks

to the cat’s nose

by Louise Carson (Canada)

soup kitchen

Santa’s suit

threadbare

by Joseph P. Wechselberger (USA)

Posted in Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Joseph P. Wechselberger, Louise Carson, Senryu | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 26, 2022

dad’s photo album . . .

childhood Christmas trees

grander in my memory​

by Susan Spooner (Canada)

 

Christmas morning 

among the rowan berries 

a lone cardinal 

by Josephine LoRe (Canada)

 

 

 

 

Posted in Canada, Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Holidays, Josephine LoRe, Short Poems, Susan Spooner | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Haiku: Nov. 25, 2022

 

holiday’s end

nothing left

but the wishbone

by Rebecca Drouilhet (USA)

Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Holiday, Rebecca Drouilhet, Senryu, Short Poems, Thanksgiving | Tagged , , , , , | 14 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 24, 2022

mulled wine

 

the family gathering

 

I’m excluded from 

 

by Paul Beech (Wales) 

Failed Haiku: A Journal of English Senryu, Vol. 5, Issue 51, March 1, 2020

 

 

“Look, Santa’s on a reindeer”. . .

he wakes

his mum

by Maureen Weldon (Wales)

 

Posted in Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Holidays, Maureen Weldon, Paul Beech, Senryu, Wales | Tagged , , , , | 13 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 23, 2022

that first kiss—
we knew it wasn’tmistletoe
by Stephen J. DeGuire (USA)
Posted in Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Senryu, Short Poems, Stephen DeGuire | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 22, 2022

three does

on the wooded knoll

Christmas morning

 

by Jon Hare (USA)

Modern Haiku, 47:1, 2016

Posted in Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Jon Hare, nature, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 21, 2022

morning moon

atop a lone fir

Christmas tree

by Mary L. Leopkey (Canada)

Asahi Haikuist Network, Nov. 18, 2022

Posted in Canada, Christmas, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Mary Leopkey, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 20, 2022

remembering Dad . . .

in the closet

Santa suit and cap

by Mona Bedi (India)

 

red poinsettia . . .

this Christmas 

without her

by Neena Singh (India)

 

Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, India, Mona Bedi, Neena Singh, Senryu | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 19, 2022

store santa

in the framed poster

suicide hotline

 

by Roberta Beary (USA/Ireland)

Failed Haiku, Issue 73, January 2021

Posted in Beginning Poets, Christmas, creative writng, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Ireland, Roberta Beary, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 18, 2022

crows

under twilight sky . . .

a bare chestnut tree

by Carole Daoust (Canada)

 

 

 

preparing

for Thanksgiving guests . . .

i rake the yard

by Rick Daddario (USA)

 

 

 

Posted in Canada, Carole Daoust, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Rick Daddario, Senryu, Short Poems, Thanksgiving | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 17, 2022

the stories

we tell ourselves

mockingbird

 

by Valorie Broadhurst Woerdehoff (USA)

Modern Haiku, 53:3, 2022

 

 

 

black friday

two crows tear

at a plastic bag

 

by Jennifer Hambrick (USA)

tinywords, Issue 18.2, Nov. 23, 2018

 

 

Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Japanese-style poetry, Jennifer Hambrick, Short Poems, Valorie Woerdehoff | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 16, 2022

wild turkeys strut the city

gobble food . . .

giving thanks

by Caroline Giles Banks (USA)

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving dinner . . .

melting in my mouth

jelly cranberry from a can

by Michael Henry Lee (USA)

 

Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Holidays, Senryu, Short Poems, Thanksgiving | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 15, 2022

lying beside you

i would feel less lonely

alone

by Lev Hart (Canada)

The Haiku Foundation

March 23, 2022

 

swirling

into the storm drain

last year’s leaves

by Joanne Morcom (Canada), Author

Last Year’s Leaves, 2017

Posted in Canada, Daily Haiku, Haiku, heart, Joanne Morcom, Lev Hart, Senryu, Short Poems, wisdom | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 14, 2022

summer sun–

behind me shadows

without a name

by Nicoletta Ignatti (Italy)

Stardust Haiku, Issue 67,  July 2022

 

 

at the diner

on the day of the dead . . .

christmas carols

 

by Eavonka Ettinger (USA)

 

Posted in Daily Haiku, Eavonka Ettinger, Haiku, Italy, Nicoletta Ignatti, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 13, 2022

the scent of pine

from the Christmas Store

first day of July

by Lynn Edge (USA)

Modern Haiku, Vol. 50.1, 2019

 

Late night

a whistler walks

the silence

by Mallika Chari (India)

Chrysanthemum, #29, 2021

Posted in creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, India, Lynn Edge, Mallika Chari, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 12, 2022

autumn memories . . .

a red fishing cork bobs

on grandpa’s pond

by Al Gallia (USA)

dawn returns

Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology, 2022

 

 

 

scuba diving . . .

thinking of

the mortgage payment

by Cynthia Gallaher (USA)

dawn returns

Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology, 2022

Posted in Al Gallia, Cynthia Gallaher, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 11, 2022

winter solstice

the click just before

grandfather chimes

by Debbie Olson (USA)

Presence, #73,  July 2022

 

bedtime

shadow retreating

into shadow

 

by Mike Gallagher (Ireland)

World Haiku Series, 2020

Posted in creative writing, Daily Haiku, Debbie Olson, Haiku, Ireland, Mike Gallagher, Short Poems, thought | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Last Chance This Year! Two Important Books to Help Poets Excel (Free Holiday Shipping)

 

Dear Readers and Followers:

Limited copies are left of my two poetry reference books, Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All and Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing. Act now, otherwise you’ll have to wait until January when they each go into another printing!

Book #1:

Adobe Photoshop PDF

 

If you write haiku and senryu, you’re most likely serious about getting them published and improving your skills. You need to write the best poems you’re capable of. And, if you’d like to teach haiku and senryu at any level, to adults and students alike, you’ll need guidance. Having the right tools are essential.

 

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All is available directly through me for purchase.  This is just the right book to get you writing, publishing, or teaching haiku and senryu! The book is offered for $19.95 – free holiday shipping starts now, and ends Nov. 28, 2022.  (USA Customers). Canadians, please inquire about a holiday discount that ends Nov. 28, 2022.

 

As an added bonus for all purchasers who buy directly from me, I’ll provide an edit or revision of a haiku or senryu on any theme so that it will appear on this blog.

 

 You may contact me directly at c-books@hotmail.com with questions and for ordering information.

 

Below are some of the best reviews of Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All.  And beneath these reviews, you’ll find information about my latest poetry book, Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing that will put you on the successful path to getting other poetic forms published.

 

 

Thanks to all of you who’ve taken the time to read all seven of my books and to comment through the years. It’s much appreciated. And thank you for reading this blog.

 

Keep writing with resolve to get published!

 

Best Wishes,

 

Charlotte Digregorio

 

 

Note: Charlotte Digregorio is a retired Writing and Foreign Language Professor, winner of 71 poetry awards, and a four-time nominee for Pushcart Prizes. She has more than 800 poems in print and writes 15 poetic forms. Digregorio has organized poetry conferences throughout the country, and speaks and gives workshops at national conferences. Her popular solo exhibits of healing poetry are featured at libraries, corporate buildings, hospitals, galleries, and park districts, among other venues.

 

  

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All (232 pages)

 

This is the book that has launched thousands of haiku poets and haiku teachers!

 

 

An altogether brilliant work that must be read by anyone with so much as a passing interest in haiku. Charlotte Digregorio has penned a masterpiece! She has written the definitive guide to one of poetry’s most fascinating genres. This work belongs on the bookshelf of any poet who is serious about writing the kind of haiku that editors want to publish.

 

-–John J. Dunphy, Author and Poet, Touching Each Tree

 

 

This book is overall the best one out there on the subject. The amount of information is extraordinary and exceeds that found in any other book. In particular, the commentaries on selected poems are very good, intelligent, and sensitive, and really place keys into the hands of readers for unlocking the mysteries and joys of haiku literature–from its roots in Japan to its present robust evolution in English and other languages.

 

-–Michael McClintock, Award-Winning Author/Editor of Haiku & Tanka Books

Former President of The Tanka Society of America

 

 

If a book about haiku inspires the reader to create haiku, then Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku and senryu guide has done its job bountifully. Digregorio calls this “A Simple Guide for All” and she isn’t kidding. Her basic instruction simplifies the process of writing haiku without sacrificing the beauty and the pleasure that are essential. The examples of well-known haikuists shimmer with perfection! If you are interested in pursuing this lovely, subtle art form, THIS is the guide you need. Fantastic guide! I can’t believe how much I learned.

 

-–Robin Stratton, EditorBoston Literary Magazine

 

 

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All is exactly what it says it is: a way into the reading, writing and publishing of the world’s favorite genre. Premised on the idea that one doesn’t need to be a professional poet to enjoy it, Haiku and Senryu will inform you on why poets and non-poets alike love the genre; how to read them for maximum enjoyment; where they came from; how to organize them; and how to get them into print and other people’s heads. Whether a newbie or a seasoned veteran, you’re sure to come away with a deeper appreciation of the genre. And it’s also a considerable anthology of some of the best English-language haiku to be found.

 

–The Haiku Foundation

 

 

A strong overview of haiku. A wealth of material on how to introduce and teach haiku to children, college students, and interested adults. For busy teachers, the material will make it easier to provide guidance to their students. Any teacher would be thrilled for the helpful guidance, examples, and tools for presenting the form to the next generation. The pain and work involved in creating one’s own lesson plans is gone with the author’s well-honed presentations.

 

 

The bibliography also contains a wealth of material. Buy a copy for teachers, students, or interested poets and just tell them to read it. This volume will not steer them wrong, and gives any reader something with meat to hang their hat on while they discover or further explore haiku. It will remain on my shelf.

 

  

Mike Rehling, Book Reviewer, United Haiku and Tanka Society

 

 

 

Marvelous book! Marvelous insight. I truly enjoyed this book, being wonderfully surprised by the new information I didn’t know. The chapter on teaching haiku was especially great, since I’ve taught it, but by a different method. And, Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku often evoke a chuckle of wry recognition or stop you dead in your tracks from awe. She seems well acquainted with the quotidian’s variety of her days, from homeless folk, to nature’s evocation and to loss and sorrow.

 

 

-–Donna BauerlyProfessor Emeritus, Loras College

 

 

An energetic and comprehensive guide by a prolific writer and educator with insightful perspectives and a generous sampling of published haiku and senryu. This practical guide is delivered in a relaxed, conversational tone so that the lessons and examples are informative and easily accessible. Extensive appendices and bibliography.

 

 

Frogpond, Journal of the Haiku Society of America

 

 

This book will hook the beginning reader and leave them wanting more. The book demystifies the genre. It offers haiku that are accessible and doable. The “Getting Published” section offers some good tips on submitting to and building a relationship with editors. The large reference section with bibliography of educational books, anthologies, collections, journals, and websites will be of great value to beginning readers.

 

–Paul Miller, Editor of Modern Haiku

 

 

I honor the work Charlotte Digregorio has done on behalf of English-language haiku in Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All. She has a gift for writing clearly, concentrating on what matters beyond passing controversy. As for her own fresh and gritty poems, Digregorio has the courage to face the truth about love, loss, aging, birth/death and the upside down nature of lifethe full catastrophe. Expect to be challenged and invigorated.

 

 

–Dr. Robert Epstein, Psychologist

Author, Checkout Time is Noon: Death Awareness Haiku

 

 

A couple of the many sterling qualities of Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku include perceptive observance of natural phenomena and penetrating insights into human nature, frequently with a delightful, wry humor in the latter category, along with deep compassion in others.

 

Robert Spiess, Former Editor of Modern Haiku

 

 

Anyone can benefit from this book’s simple, clear advice. Digregorio offers time-tested, yet fresh and flexible pedagogy–actual lesson plans for those who wish to teach haiku. Intermediate and advanced practitioners will benefit from reminders of simple concepts long forgotten or never learned. We are given new ways to think about the poetry we read.

 

 

Speed Bump Journal

 

 

Offers excellent advice on haiku writing. It is a great book and has helped many of us in our haiku journey, and doubtless will for many years to come.

 

Andy McLellan, UK Poet and Author, birth/stones: Selected Haiku and Haibun

 

 

BOOK  #2 – Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing

RipplesCover020120.indd

 

 

Everyone needs healing. Writing poems about your hardships and struggles often helps to alleviate life’s pain and hurts.

 

“Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing” will inspire you to put your thoughts on paper and write expressive long and short poetry including free verse, sonnets, and the Japanese forms, to name just a few of the 15 forms.

 

A signed copy of this book is available directly from me, for $19.95 –free holiday shipping starts now, and ends Nov. 28, 2022.  (USA customers).  Canadians, please inquire about a holiday discount that ends Nov. 28, 2022.

 

As a bonus, I’ll provide an edit or revision of a poem of any form to appear on this blog.

 

You may contact me directly at c-books@hotmail.com with questions and for ordering information.

 

Below are some of the best reviews of “Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing.”

 

 

“Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing,” a reference book, will inspire you to write many forms of poetry. The book contains poems such as cinquain, etheree, acrostic, sonnet, free verse, limerick, and the Japanese forms of tanka, haibun, haiku and senryu sequences, among others.

 

 

 

Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing (236 pages) 

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Awards (2021): Independent Book Publishers Association

 

 

 Comments from Judge #1:

 

 

Life in all its aspects flows through Charlotte Digregorio’s buoyant poetry collection. For its healing and inspirational qualities, this is a book to keep and reread frequently. It inspires enhanced living and writing. Excellent!

 

 

 Comments from Judge #2

 

This book is a very easy and pleasurable read.  I read every poem with delight in about six days. (236 pages). There are lines in the poetry that if they were fireworks would light up the night sky. This book is that good. The introduction is a marvelous bit of writing, explaining the author’s view on poetry, and about the title’s meaning. All through the book, when each new section is about to unfold, there is a prose explanation of what one is about to encounter. These preludes to the sections are one of the best features of the book.

 

 

Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing comes in a year when healing is in even greater demand than usual. In this book, we not only get a well-written poetry collection that promotes healing, but a how-to guide for writing poetry that aids healing. As I read it, I often paused to implement Digregorio’s suggestions, jotting down poems of my own, and filled several pages. The author is particularly well known as an authority on the Japanese forms of haiku and senryu, and many of the poems in this book follow them. Others are in free verse and a dozen other forms. The collection is structured into sections containing poems about various subjects you can consider writing about. Each section is introduced by a page of prose that includes the author’s sage comments on why the subject is relevant and how the poems influence healing. The poems and writing advice are clear, accessible, and beautifully lyrical. Her point is: look, you can do this.  I highly recommend this book.

 

–Richard Allen Taylor, Author of Armed and Luminous

Book Reviewer,  The Main Street Rag

 

 

I highly, highly recommend this book! I read a lot of how-to-write poetry books, but this is unique because it shows would-be poets like me the “why” of writing poems. For those who want to write the best poetry we are capable of, this collection encourages us to look for and create beauty, strength, and healing. Many times during the reading of this book, I put it down and wrote a few lines of my own. I read several of Digregorio’s poems out loud, luxuriating in the evocative language and the emotional effect it had on me. Her haiku is particularly inspiring and she is a master at it.  I love this book. It’s not just a collection of poems, but thoughtful essays about how poetry can heal. There are a lot of lines I would like to quote (or pretend I came up with).  I love the imagery.

–Robin Stratton, Editor, Boston Literary Magazine

 

 

This book is different from any poetry book I have reviewed before. We need this book! Who among us has not needed healing? Who among us has not spent time in the cave of despair? Who among us has not needed an outlet for anger or loss? This is great poetry, mature craftsmanship, written in an accessible style for all to savor. It’s easy to apply these poems to daily life. A professional observer, Digregorio sees and feels everything more deeply. She reveals her sensitivity to the human condition. The volume contains something for everyone: from compact oriental forms, to superbly-crafted sonnets, to the little known etheree, to fun forms such as acrostics and limericks, free verse and more.

 

Exhaustive Appendices: More than a collection of poetry, the author offers practical, hands-on support for beginning and experienced writers.  As poets, we also need to promote and sell our poetry, our books, and the author helps get us off the sidelines and into the promotional game. Treasures to be unearthed include multiple lists of publications that publish poetry; ideas for general print/broadcast media that feature poets; and ideas on types of associations, organizations, and businesses that promote poets through awards, interviews, readings, speaking venues, workshops engagements, and exhibitions of their work. This book has given me a real education.

 

–Michael Escoubas, Editor, Quill and Parchment

 

  

Digregorio’s poetry is healing, gets you through tough times, and saves lives. This book is one answer to the Coronavirus. In spending time reading it, we find an encouraging and peaceful way to live. Nuanced by childhood memories of oceans and jagged monoliths, of black bear and elk, she shares through reflection and meditation, poems with a spaciousness that speak of acceptance and gratitude for what is. She is like the sculptor in one of her poems, “creating equilibrium and harmony.” She reaches out and invites the reader to join her in solitude, share thoughts, and observations. Ultimately, there is a sense of community, of knowing we aren’t alone. There’s an exuberance of life here that cannot help but touch you. It is a book you can go back to time and time again.

 

–Mary Jo Balistreri, Poet and Author, Still

 

 

Fascinating tome–the perfect fit for this time in history. Soothing and peaceful. The author balances different poetic forms that contribute to a melodic, musical timbre. I marked many pages as my favorite poems–far too many to list here. Gorgeous words describing the natural world and her insightful memories in the “Nostalgia” section. Her poems wend their way through the maze of life events and experiences, healing in their warm, lyrical beauty.

 

 

–The Rockford Review, Sally Hewitt, Editor

 

 

 

The bumper sticker on my car reads: “Nature: Cheaper than Therapy.” As an adjunct to nature’s treatment plan, I would prescribe Charlotte Digregorio’s  Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing. Her imagistic poems wind through diverse relational and emotional terrain, and never lose touch with the natural healing qualities of acceptance, wonder, gratitude, and harmony.

 

 

–Mike Stinson, Psychotherapist, Poet & Author, extra innings

 

   

What a treasure and a wonder from a mightily accomplished author. I always turn to this book with anticipation and peace in my heart, looking forward to the author’s life insights. A ponderous book. I am giving it the daily reading that the inspiring poems call out for, a page or two a day with meditative thought for the author’s many layered gifts of creativity. I love the titles of the multi-themed chapters. I am delving into this clear pond of healing, the book’s healing messages.

 

 

–Donna Bauerly, Professor Emeritus, Loras College

 

 

  

An affecting collection. Charlotte Digregorio finds lyricism in solitude, finds reason to celebrate and transform into art the trifles in our gritty lives. These are poems of great skill, poems with a generous heart by a writer who cherishes the luminous particulars of every moment.

 

 

–Marsh Muirhead, Poet and Author of last night of the carnival

 

 

 

Award-winning poet Charlotte Digregorio offers readers an array of poems that delve deeply into the external, her Midwest surroundings, and the internal, the nature of her creativity. Digregorio’s delectable collection is one to be savored again and again.

 

 

–Roberta Beary, Poet and Author of The Unworn Necklace

 

 

The poems of Charlotte Digregorio possess a clarity of vision one seldom finds in contemporary verse. The images she creates are vibrant and alive. We Baby Boomers identify with her all too well.

 

 

–John J. Dunphy, Poet and Author of Touching Each Tree

 

 

We are blessed with this work! This is a comforting, much appreciated companion in these difficult times. The book responds to so many of the themes and issues that are central to my life experience. It sustains, and I am thankful.  I hope this book makes its way to many people in these sad times. It provides shade from the glare of events.

 

 

–David Eyre, Educator and Author, the nothing that is

 

 

Charlotte Digregorio has the all-too-uncommon ability to put the reader in the poet’s place. One does not read, so much as experience her poems. Closing my eyes, many of these poems could have been memories from my own past. These very personal poems become personal to the reader. The poet uses words as her brush, and all senses are stimulated.

 

 

–Ignatius Fay, Poet and Co-Author of Breccia

 

 

This is a self-help book that is the pathway to finding peace. The author’s healing poems speak to us and are especially timely during the Covid crisis.

 

–Winnetka-Kenilworth Living magazine (Illinois)

 

 

This elegantly designed book offers readers an eclectic mix of poetry styles to suit any and every mood. Here, you may find your senses soothed, or stimulated by the natural world. There, you might find yourself immersed in memories, or daydreams about the future. This writer has walked in our shoes, and her words entice us to take the first steps along the poetic path to healing.

 

 

–Debbie Strange, Canadian Poet and Author of The Language of Loss

 

  

Charlotte Digregorio is a much-published and much-honored poet. The approaches to writing she shares in this collection prove useful for those who seek inspiration and for those who give writing workshops.

 

–Maxianne Berger, Book Review Coordinator, Haiku Canada Review

Posted in Charlotte Digregorio, Free Verse, Haiku, Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All, Instruction, Publishing, reference Books, Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Double Haiku: Nov. 10, 2022

wedged clay

for the potter’s wheel

centering my core

by Ingrid Baluchi (North Macedonia)

The Heron’s Nest, XXlll:l, March 2021

  

nothing

on the list today—

wild roses

by Ruth Holzer (USA)

The Heron’s Nest, Vol. XXIV, No. 3, September 2022

Posted in creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Ingrid Baluchi, Ruth Holzer, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 9, 2022

fallen leaves
fill the trenches –
with guns
 
 
by June Read (Canada)
Remembrance Day, Canada, November 11, 2022
 
Posted in Canada, Daily Haiku, death, Haiku, Holidays, June Read, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Daily Haiku Special: Neena Singh, Nov. 8, 2022

bird feedera chickadee’s beaklaced with snow
 
 
by Neena Singh (India)
Honorable Mention
The Haiku Foundation Monthly Kukai, January 2022
 
 
 
flowing riverI so wish to be a fishamong the fish
by Neena Singh (India)
The Heron’s Nest, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, March 2022
 
 
 
hearing the musicof the forest …autumn rain
 
by Neena Singh (India)
under the basho, Sept. 5, 2022
 
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, India, Neena Singh | Tagged , , , | 24 Comments

Don’t Miss This International Contest from The Asahi Haikuist Network in Japan!

Thank you to David McMurray of The Asahi Haikuist Network for the following:

Dear Readers of Charlotte Digregorio’s Writers Blog, According to a recently published haiku by Charlotte Digregorio, she may very well have tightened the shoulder straps on her backpack and set off on a solo journey in search of healing… On return it seems she recorded her trip in the form of a stirring haiku, that was published in the Asahi Haikuist Network. I recommend taking the time to read and re-read her vibrant poem during the eclipse of tonight’s beaver moon.                                                 * * * Horsetail ferns grow throughout the state of Illinois where Charlotte Digregorio recently went hiking. Herbal tisanes are believed to reduce anxiety and stress and calm the mind.after his deathbackpacking alone…horsetails don’t heal my hurt                                                    * * *    Here is a complimentary link to this haiku-> https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/14757976

Don’t Miss This Contest:

The 12th Setouchi-Matsuyama International Photo-Haiku Contest supported by The Asahi Shimbun offers writers the chance to win a prize for taking photos and writing haiku about the sea. Enter online until Jan. 11: (https://matsuyamahaiku.jp/contest/free_eng/).  Kind regards,  David McMurray

 

 

Posted in Asahi Haikuist Network, contest, Submissions | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 7, 2022

a single candle for the ailing world . . . night before Diwali

by Milan Rajkumar (India)

Frogpond, 44.1, 2021

Posted in Haiku, Holidays, India, Milan Rajkumar, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 6, 2022

elevator graffiti:
the grammar corrected
in red ink


by Tom Clausen (USA)
Frogpond, Vol. XIV,  No. 4,  Winter 1991

Posted in creative writers, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Poets, Senryu, Short Poems, Tom Clausen | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 5, 2022

home office 
my paperweight 
preens her fur


                  Amy Losak(USA)    
Haiku in the Workplace, Aug. 9, 2017
Posted in Amy Losak, cats, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Pets, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Last Chance This Year: Two Important Books to Help Poets Excel! (Free Holiday Shipping)

Dear Readers and Followers:

Limited copies are left of my two poetry reference books, Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All and Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing. Act now, otherwise you’ll have to wait until January when they each go into another printing!

Book #1:

Adobe Photoshop PDF

If you write haiku and senryu, you’re most likely serious about getting them published and improving your skills. You need to write the best poems you’re capable of. And, if you’d like to teach haiku and senryu at any level, to adults and students alike, you’ll need guidance. Having the right tools are essential.

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All is available directly through me for purchase.  This is just the right book to get you writing, publishing, or teaching haiku and senryu! The book is offered for $19.95 – free holiday shipping starts now, and ends Nov. 28, 2022.  (USA Customers). Canadians, please inquire about a holiday discount that ends Nov. 28, 2022.

As an added bonus for all purchasers who buy directly from me, I’ll provide an edit or revision of a haiku or senryu on any theme so that it will appear on this blog.

 

 You may contact me directly at c-books@hotmail.com with questions and for ordering information.

Below are some of the best reviews of Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All.  And beneath these reviews, you’ll find information about my latest poetry book, Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing that will put you on the successful path to getting other poetic forms published.

 

Thanks to all of you who’ve taken the time to read all seven of my books and to comment through the years. It’s much appreciated. And thank you for reading this blog.

Keep writing with resolve to get published!

Best Wishes,

Charlotte Digregorio

Note: Charlotte Digregorio is a retired Writing and Foreign Language Professor, winner of 71 poetry awards, and a four-time nominee for Pushcart Prizes. She has more than 800 poems in print and writes 15 poetic forms. Digregorio has organized poetry conferences throughout the country, and speaks and gives workshops at national conferences. Her popular solo exhibits of healing poetry are featured at libraries, corporate buildings, hospitals, galleries, and park districts, among other venues.

 

  

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All (232 pages)

 

This is the book that has launched thousands of haiku poets and haiku teachers!

 

 

An altogether brilliant work that must be read by anyone with so much as a passing interest in haiku. Charlotte Digregorio has penned a masterpiece! She has written the definitive guide to one of poetry’s most fascinating genres. This work belongs on the bookshelf of any poet who is serious about writing the kind of haiku that editors want to publish.

 

-–John J. Dunphy, Author and Poet, Touching Each Tree

 

 

This book is overall the best one out there on the subject. The amount of information is extraordinary and exceeds that found in any other book. In particular, the commentaries on selected poems are very good, intelligent, and sensitive, and really place keys into the hands of readers for unlocking the mysteries and joys of haiku literature–from its roots in Japan to its present robust evolution in English and other languages.

 

 

-–Michael McClintock, Award-Winning Author/Editor of Haiku & Tanka Books

Former President of The Tanka Society of America

If a book about haiku inspires the reader to create haiku, then Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku and senryu guide has done its job bountifully. Digregorio calls this “A Simple Guide for All” and she isn’t kidding. Her basic instruction simplifies the process of writing haiku without sacrificing the beauty and the pleasure that are essential. The examples of well-known haikuists shimmer with perfection! If you are interested in pursuing this lovely, subtle art form, THIS is the guide you need. Fantastic guide! I can’t believe how much I learned.

 

-–Robin Stratton, EditorBoston Literary Magazine

 

Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All is exactly what it says it is: a way into the reading, writing and publishing of the world’s favorite genre. Premised on the idea that one doesn’t need to be a professional poet to enjoy it, Haiku and Senryu will inform you on why poets and non-poets alike love the genre; how to read them for maximum enjoyment; where they came from; how to organize them; and how to get them into print and other people’s heads. Whether a newbie or a seasoned veteran, you’re sure to come away with a deeper appreciation of the genre. And it’s also a considerable anthology of some of the best English-language haiku to be found.

–The Haiku Foundation

 

A strong overview of haiku. A wealth of material on how to introduce and teach haiku to children, college students, and interested adults. For busy teachers the material will make it easier to provide guidance to their students. Any teacher would be thrilled for the helpful guidance, examples, and tools for presenting the form to the next generation. The pain and work involved in creating one’s own lesson plans is gone with the author’s well-honed presentations.

 

The bibliography also contains a wealth of material. Buy a copy for teachers, students, or interested poets and just tell them to read it. This volume will not steer them wrong, and gives any reader something with meat to hang their hat on while they discover or further explore haiku. It will remain on my shelf.

  

Mike Rehling, Book Reviewer, United Haiku and Tanka Society

 

Marvelous book! Marvelous insight. I truly enjoyed this book, being wonderfully surprised by the new information I didn’t know. The chapter on teaching haiku was especially great, since I’ve taught it, but by a different method. And, Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku often evoke a chuckle of wry recognition or stop you dead in your tracks from awe. She seems well acquainted with the quotidian’s variety of her days, from homeless folk, to nature’s evocation and to loss and sorrow.

 

-–Donna BauerlyProfessor Emeritus, Loras College

An energetic and comprehensive guide by a prolific writer and educator with insightful perspectives and a generous sampling of published haiku and senryu. This practical guide is delivered in a relaxed, conversational tone so that the lessons and examples are informative and easily accessible. Extensive appendices and bibliography.

 

Frogpond, Journal of the Haiku Society of America

This book will hook the beginning reader and leave them wanting more. The book demystifies the genre. It offers haiku that are accessible and doable. The “Getting Published” section offers some good tips on submitting to and building a relationship with editors. The large reference section with bibliography of educational books, anthologies, collections, journals, and websites will be of great value to beginning readers.

 

–Paul Miller, Editor of Modern Haiku

 

 

I honor the work Charlotte Digregorio has done on behalf of English-language haiku in Haiku and Senryu: A Simple Guide for All. She has a gift for writing clearly, concentrating on what matters beyond passing controversy. As for her own fresh and gritty poems, Digregorio has the courage to face the truth about love, loss, aging, birth/death and the upside down nature of lifethe full catastrophe. Expect to be challenged and invigorated.

 

–Dr. Robert Epstein, Psychologist

Author, Checkout Time is Noon: Death Awareness Haiku

 

 

A couple of the many sterling qualities of Charlotte Digregorio’s haiku include perceptive observance of natural phenomena and penetrating insights into human nature, frequently with a delightful, wry humor in the latter category, along with deep compassion in others.

 

Robert Spiess, Former Editor of Modern Haiku

 

 

Anyone can benefit from this book’s simple, clear advice. Digregorio offers time-tested, yet fresh and flexible pedagogy–actual lesson plans for those who wish to teach haiku. Intermediate and advanced practitioners will benefit from reminders of simple concepts long forgotten or never learned. We are given new ways to think about the poetry we read.

 

Speed Bump Journal

 

 

Offers excellent advice on haiku writing. It is a great book and has helped many of us in our haiku journey, and doubtless will for many years to come.

 

Andy McLellan, UK Poet and Author, birth/stones: Selected Haiku and Haibun

 

 

BOOK  #2 – Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing

RipplesCover020120.indd

 

Everyone needs healing. Writing poems about your hardships and struggles often helps to alleviate life’s pain and hurts.

“Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing” will inspire you to put your thoughts on paper and write expressive long and short poetry including free verse, sonnets, and the Japanese forms, to name just a few of the 15 forms.

A signed copy of this book is available directly from me, for $19.95 –free holiday shipping starts now, and ends Nov. 28, 2022.  (USA customers).  Canadians, please inquire about a holiday discount that ends Nov. 28, 2022.

As a bonus, I’ll provide an edit or revision of a poem of any form to appear on this blog. 

You may contact me directly at c-books@hotmail.com with questions and for ordering information.

Below are some of the best reviews of “Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing.”

 

“Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing,” a reference book, will inspire you to write many forms of poetry. The book contains poems such as cinquain, etheree, acrostic, sonnet, free verse, limerick, and the Japanese forms of tanka, haibun, haiku and senryu sequences, among others.

 

 

 

Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing (236 pages) 

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Awards (2021): Independent Book Publishers Association

 

 Comments from Judge #1:

 

 

Life in all its aspects flows through Charlotte Digregorio’s buoyant poetry collection. For its healing and inspirational qualities, this is a book to keep and reread frequently. It inspires enhanced living and writing. Excellent!

 Comments from Judge #2

 

This book is a very easy and pleasurable read.  I read every poem with delight in about six days. (236 pages). There are lines in the poetry that if they were fireworks would light up the night sky. This book is that good. The introduction is a marvelous bit of writing, explaining the author’s view on poetry, and about the title’s meaning. All through the book, when each new section is about to unfold, there is a prose explanation of what one is about to encounter. These preludes to the sections are one of the best features of the book.

Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing comes in a year when healing is in even greater demand than usual. In this book, we not only get a well-written poetry collection that promotes healing, but a how-to guide for writing poetry that aids healing. As I read it, I often paused to implement Digregorio’s suggestions, jotting down poems of my own, and filled several pages. The author is particularly well known as an authority on the Japanese forms of haiku and senryu, and many of the poems in this book follow them. Others are in free verse and a dozen other forms. The collection is structured into sections containing poems about various subjects you can consider writing about. Each section is introduced by a page of prose that includes the author’s sage comments on why the subject is relevant and how the poems influence healing. The poems and writing advice are clear, accessible, and beautifully lyrical. Her point is: look, you can do this.  I highly recommend this book.

–Richard Allen Taylor, Author of Armed and Luminous

Book Reviewer,  The Main Street Rag

 

 

I highly, highly recommend this book! I read a lot of how-to-write poetry books, but this is unique because it shows would-be poets like me the “why” of writing poems. For those who want to write the best poetry we are capable of, this collection encourages us to look for and create beauty, strength, and healing. Many times during the reading of this book, I put it down and wrote a few lines of my own. I read several of Digregorio’s poems out loud, luxuriating in the evocative language and the emotional effect it had on me. Her haiku is particularly inspiring and she is a master at it.  I love this book. It’s not just a collection of poems, but thoughtful essays about how poetry can heal. There are a lot of lines I would like to quote (or pretend I came up with).  I love the imagery.

–Robin Stratton, Editor, Boston Literary Magazine

 

 

This book is different from any poetry book I have reviewed before. We need this book! Who among us has not needed healing? Who among us has not spent time in the cave of despair? Who among us has not needed an outlet for anger or loss? This is great poetry, mature craftsmanship, written in an accessible style for all to savor. It’s easy to apply these poems to daily life. A professional observer, Digregorio sees and feels everything more deeply. She reveals her sensitivity to the human condition. The volume contains something for everyone: from compact oriental forms, to superbly-crafted sonnets, to the little known etheree, to fun forms such as acrostics and limericks, free verse and more.

Exhaustive Appendices: More than a collection of poetry, the author offers practical, hands-on support for beginning and experienced writers.  As poets, we also need to promote and sell our poetry, our books, and the author helps get us off the sidelines and into the promotional game. Treasures to be unearthed include multiple lists of publications that publish poetry; ideas for general print/broadcast media that feature poets; and ideas on types of associations, organizations, and businesses that promote poets through awards, interviews, readings, speaking venues, workshops engagements, and exhibitions of their work. This book has given me a real education.

–Michael Escoubas, Editor, Quill and Parchment

 

  

Digregorio’s poetry is healing, gets you through tough times, and saves lives. This book is one answer to the Coronavirus. In spending time reading it, we find an encouraging and peaceful way to live. Nuanced by childhood memories of oceans and jagged monoliths, of black bear and elk, she shares through reflection and meditation, poems with a spaciousness that speak of acceptance and gratitude for what is. She is like the sculptor in one of her poems, “creating equilibrium and harmony.” She reaches out and invites the reader to join her in solitude, share thoughts, and observations. Ultimately, there is a sense of community, of knowing we aren’t alone. There’s an exuberance of life here that cannot help but touch you. It is a book you can go back to time and time again.

–Mary Jo Balistreri, Poet and Author, Still

 

 

Fascinating tome–the perfect fit for this time in history. Soothing and peaceful. The author balances different poetic forms that contribute to a melodic, musical timbre. I marked many pages as my favorite poems–far too many to list here. Gorgeous words describing the natural world and her insightful memories in the “Nostalgia” section. Her poems wend their way through the maze of life events and experiences, healing in their warm, lyrical beauty.

–The Rockford Review, Sally Hewitt, Editor

 

 

 

The bumper sticker on my car reads: “Nature: Cheaper than Therapy.” As an adjunct to nature’s treatment plan, I would prescribe Charlotte Digregorio’s  Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing. Her imagistic poems wind through diverse relational and emotional terrain, and never lose touch with the natural healing qualities of acceptance, wonder, gratitude, and harmony.

–Mike Stinson, Psychotherapist, Poet & Author, extra innings

 

   

What a treasure and a wonder from a mightily accomplished author. I always turn to this book with anticipation and peace in my heart, looking forward to the author’s life insights. A ponderous book. I am giving it the daily reading that the inspiring poems call out for, a page or two a day with meditative thought for the author’s many layered gifts of creativity. I love the titles of the multi-themed chapters. I am delving into this clear pond of healing, the book’s healing messages.

–Donna Bauerly, Professor Emeritus, Loras College

 

 

  

An affecting collection. Charlotte Digregorio finds lyricism in solitude, finds reason to celebrate and transform into art the trifles in our gritty lives. These are poems of great skill, poems with a generous heart by a writer who cherishes the luminous particulars of every moment.

–Marsh Muirhead, Poet and Author of last night of the carnival

 

 

Award-winning poet Charlotte Digregorio offers readers an array of poems that delve deeply into the external, her Midwest surroundings, and the internal, the nature of her creativity. Digregorio’s delectable collection is one to be savored again and again.

–Roberta Beary, Poet and Author of The Unworn Necklace

 

The poems of Charlotte Digregorio possess a clarity of vision one seldom finds in contemporary verse. The images she creates are vibrant and alive. We Baby Boomers identify with her all too well.

–John J. Dunphy, Poet and Author of Touching Each Tree

 

 

We are blessed with this work! This is a comforting, much appreciated companion in these difficult times. The book responds to so many of the themes and issues that are central to my life experience. It sustains, and I am thankful.  I hope this book makes its way to many people in these sad times. It provides shade from the glare of events.

–David Eyre, Educator and Author, the nothing that is

 

 

Charlotte Digregorio has the all-too-uncommon ability to put the reader in the poet’s place. One does not read, so much as experience her poems. Closing my eyes, many of these poems could have been memories from my own past. These very personal poems become personal to the reader. The poet uses words as her brush, and all senses are stimulated.

–Ignatius Fay, Poet and Co-Author of Breccia

 

 

This is a self-help book that is the pathway to finding peace. The author’s healing poems speak to us and are especially timely during the Covid crisis.

–Winnetka-Kenilworth Living magazine (Illinois)

 

This elegantly designed book offers readers an eclectic mix of poetry styles to suit any and every mood. Here, you may find your senses soothed, or stimulated by the natural world. There, you might find yourself immersed in memories, or daydreams about the future. This writer has walked in our shoes, and her words entice us to take the first steps along the poetic path to healing.

–Debbie Strange, Canadian Poet and Author of The Language of Loss

 

  

Charlotte Digregorio is a much-published and much-honored poet. The approaches to writing she shares in this collection prove useful for those who seek inspiration and for those who give writing workshops.

–Maxianne Berger, Book Review Coordinator, Haiku Canada Review

Posted in Beginners' Guide to Writing & Selling Quality Features, Free Verse, Haiku, Instruction, Poetry, Publishing, Ripples of Air: Poems of Healing, Senryu, Writing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Submissions Open!

 
 
This blog seeks haiku or senryu submissions on the theme of any holidays that fall in November, December, or January for
The Daily Haiku.
 
You may email Charlotte from Nov. 5 through Nov. 15 with just one of your best haiku or senryu  about holidays at: c-books@hotmail.com.
 
A previously-published poem is fine. An unpublished poem may be edited for clarity.
 
All are welcome to submit, especially those who’ve never appeared on this blog that features poets from sixty-one countries.
 
Charlotte’s goal is to feature all active haikuists/senryuists worldwide, beginners and experienced, who wish to appear.
 
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Holiday, Poetry Submissions, Senryu, Submissions | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 4, 2022

chorus of leaves

the ancient song

of the wind

 

by Eufemia Griffo (Italy)

Under the Basho, Modern Haiku Section, August 2020

Posted in Daily Haiku, Eufemia Griffo, Haiku, Italy, Short Poems | 13 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 3, 2022

waking before dawn . . .
i hang my thoughts
on the crescent moon
 
 
 
by Ken Mory (USA)
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Ken Mory, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku Special: Nov. 2, 2022 – Steve Schultz

 
after the morning rain
the finch’s song
sweetens my coffee
grandma’s pantry
all the good stuff
on the lower shelves
by Steve Schultz (USA)
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Senryu, Short Poems, Steve Schultz | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

Daily Haiku: Nov. 1, 2022

second winter
my side becoming
the whole bed
 
 
 
by Ben Gaa (USA)
Modern Haiku, Summer 2021
 
Posted in Ben Gaa, Daily Haiku, divorce, Haiku, men, Relationships, Senryu, women | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 31, 2022

 
thankful to be alive dandelion sun
 
 
 
by Susan Burch (USA), Author
 
Robbed, 2022
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Life, Short Poems, Susan Burch | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 30, 2022

the lighthouse blazes red
goes dark again –
year’s end
 
 
by Maeve O’Sullivan (Ireland), Author
Wasp on the Prayer Flag
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Ireland, Maeve O'Sullivan, Poets, Short Poems | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 29, 2022

autumn unfolding a plaid shirt in the country store

by Barrie Levine (USA)

           Editor’s Choice

                                          The Heron’s Nest, Vol. XXIV,  No. 1,  March 2022

Posted in autumn, Barrie Levine, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Nature, Seasons, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 28, 2022

berry-picking
we talk of the son
born bad
 
 
by Roberta Beary (USA/Ireland)
Modern Haiku, Vol. 42.3, Autumn 2011
Posted in children, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Ireland, Parents, Roberta Beary, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 27, 2022

the word rolls softly
across my tongue and teeth
Honolulu
 
 
by Howard Lee Kilby (USA)
dawn returns
Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology, 2022
Posted in creative writers, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Howard Lee Kilby, Poets, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Haiku Special with John Hawkhead

a small fat boy

standing at the school gates

inside the lost man

 

by John Hawkhead (UK)

Modern Haiku, 52.2, Summer 2021

 

 

dad and I

opening up

about our mothers

 

by John Hawkhead (UK)

Kingfisher, #3, April 2021

 

 

gathering clouds

she steps outside

to take a call

by John Hawkhead (UK)

tsuri-dōrō, #3,  2021

Posted in creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, John Hawkhead, Senryu, Short Poems, UK | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 25, 2022

 

she waltzes

with the wrong partner . . .

square dancing

by Jerome Berglund (USA)

 

 

Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Humor, Jerome Berglund, men, Senryu, Short Poems, women | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Daily Haiku: Oct. 24, 2022

cat’s tongue
laps the Atlantic
from my damp skin
 
 
 
by Doris Lynch (USA)
The Heron’s Nest, December 2013
 
 
Posted in Daily Haiku, Doris Lynch, Haiku, micro-poetry, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Haiku: Oct. 23, 2022

October moon –

the shadow of a farewell

that comes and goes

 

by Maria Teresa Piras (Italy)

Cold Moon Journal, Oct. 9, 2022

Posted in creative writing, Haiku, Italy, Maria Teresa Piras, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 22, 2022

green sprouts spring gossip
 
 
by kjmunro (Canada)
Haiku Canada Review, Vol. 10, No. 1, February 2016
 
Posted in Canada, creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, kjmunro, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 21, 2022

 
last phone call
with Mom–
only my voice
 
 
by C.R. Manley (USA)
Kingfisher, #4, 2021
Posted in C.R. Manley, creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 20, 2022

tree root interrupting the
path interrupting
the tree root
 
 
 
by Matt Snyder (USA)
Akitsu Quarterly, Spring 2022
Posted in creative writing, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Matt Snyder, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 19, 2022

summer heat
licking peanut butter
off a knife
by Dyana Basist (USA)
Mariposa, Autumn/Winter 2021
 
 
Posted in Daily Haiku, Dyana Basist, Haiku, Senryu, Short Poems, Writing | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku Special: Oct. 18, 2022– Eufemia Griffo

THREE HAIKU

leaf after leaf

the silence falls

between us

by Eufemia Griffo (Italy)

Chrysanthemum, 26, 2019

harvest moon

the last sparkle

of summer grass

by Eufemia Griffo (Italy)

Chrysanthemum, 26, 2019

loneliness

silent snowflakes

in my hair

by Eufemia Griffo (Italy)

DailyHaiga, January 2018

Posted in creative writers, Daily Haiku, Eufemia Griffo, Haiku, Italy, Short Poems | Tagged , , , , | 18 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 17, 2022

autumn wind

I pull another gray hair

from my jacket sleeve

 

by Susan Antolin (USA), Author

Artichoke Season

Posted in Aging, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Poets, Senryu, Susan Antolin | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 16, 2022

my shortcomings
i bake pizza for him
with a new recipe
          

by Lucia Fontana (Italy)
HaikUniverse, 2021
Posted in Daily Haiku, Haiku, Italy, Lucia Fontana, Relationships, Senryu, Short Poems | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Daily Haiku: Oct. 15, 2022

the moon disappears
in a cloud bank
reading his will

by Sheila Sondik (USA)

Modern Haiku, Vol. 45:1, Winter-Spring 2014

Posted in Daily Haiku, death, Haiku, Senryu, Sheila Sondik, Short Poems | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Daily Haiku: Oct. 14, 2022

Sisyphus in my laundry basket
 
 
by Meg Arnot (Australia/UK)
FemKuMag, No. 15, August 2019
Posted in Australia, Daily Haiku, Haiku, Meg Arnot, Senryu, short poems, UK | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments